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m M C M1NNVILLE 






COLLEGE. 









ANNUAL CATALOGUE 




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4890-91. 
JUL 15 IpJl 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE 



McMINNVILLE, 



OREGON. 




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lik Announcements for 
186)1-$. 



YAMHILL COUNTY REPORTER STEAM PRINT. 
McMinnville, Oregon. 



DOES IT PAY TO ESTABLISH AND BUILD UP 
COLLEGES? 



"Planting colleges and filling them with studious young men .and 
women is planting seed-corn for the world." — Adonirara Judson. 

A college that makes a "glorious union of the highest learning with 
the deepest piety, is a light to lighten the nations and the glory of our 
Israel," — George W, Eaton. 



IS A COLLEGE EDUCATION HELPFUL TO SUC- 
CESS IN BUSINESS LIFE? 



"My own class in Harvard College numbered eighty-nine at gradua- 
tion. Eleven of that number, or one-eighth of the whole, have attained 
remarkable success in business. * * In Eastern Massachu- 

setts, graduates of Harvard get greatly more than their due numerical 
proportion of the best places in banking, insurance, transportation and 
manufacturing. * * * I speak from no little personal obser- 
vation when I say that there is no more striking general fact about the 
graduates of Harvard during the past fifty years than their eminent 
success in business. From one-fifth to one-third of the members of the 
successive graduating classes ultimately go into business. The same is 
probably true of many another American college." — President Elliott of 
Harvard Universitv. 



THE BAPTIST COLLEGE 

AT McMINNVILLE 

was chartered 
by the legislature of 
1858-9. It is under the con- 
trol OF the baptist denomination of* 
OREGON. Its aim is to offer to young men 
and women the best education possible at the least 
possible expense to them. It has a collegiate, academic 
and musical department. it has eight coltrses of study, three 
leading to degrees and five leading to certificates of 
graduation. full information as to expenses, 
courses of study and advantages for 
the school year 1891-92 will 
be found in this 
catalogue. 



CALENDAR 1891-92. 



The school year is divided into three terms of thirteen weeks each. 

First term begins Tuesday, September 8,1891 

First term closes Friday, December 4, 1891 

Second term begins Monday, December 7, 1891 

Holiday vacation December 25, 1891— January 2, 1892 

Second term closes Friday, March 11, 1892 

Third term begins Monday, March 14, 1892 

Commencement exercises June 5, 1892 

Regular recitations and full work on the first day of each term. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. , 
Term Exires June, 1892. 

Rev. A. J. Hunsaker Independence 

Amasa Sanders McMinnville 

J. E. Magers 

Rev. C. M. Hill Portland 

• Rev. John Gordon, D. D " 

David Hurst •. .Salem 

Term Expires June, 1893. 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, L. L. D Oregon City 

Hon. Henry Failing Portland 

Hon. Joseph Cravens Independence 

D. C. Latourette Oregon City 

N. J. Blagen Portland 

Rev. R. McKillop McMinnville 

Term Expires June, 1894. 

Rev. R. Whitaker Salem 

Hon. J. N. Dolph Portiand 

A. C. Chandler McMinnville 

John H. Smith Astoria 

J. M. Pruett, M. D Pendleton 

Henry F. Merrill Albany 

Officers of the Board. 

President Rev. C. M. Hill Portland 

Secretary A. C. Chandler McMinnville 

Treasurer Hon. W. C. Johnson, L. L. D Oregon City 

Executive Committee. 

J. E. Magers, Rev. R. McKillop, Rev. R. Whitaker, 

A. C. Chandler, A. M. Sanders. 

Examining Committee. 

Rev. G. W. Hill, Albany; Rkv. W. E. McCutcheon, Carlton; 

Mrs. Virginia Watson, Portland ; Mrs. D. C. Latourette, Oregon Cy 





5 




FACULTY. 








T. G. BROWNSON, President, 




< 




Latin, Psychology, Philosophy. 

! 




■ 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 




Mathematics, Greek. 




MRS. T. G. BROWNSON, 
French, German, English. 




W. F. FARGO, 




Sciences, History. 




| 
FLORA E. WOLFENDEN, 




Music, Elocution. 




EMANUEL NORTHUP, 




Librarian. 


The names of the Faculty appear in the order of their appointment. 



THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



The aim of this department is to give broad culture and thorough 
scholarship. To-day hundreds who expect to enter business life, as well 
as those who are looking toward the professions, are anxious to secure 
the broadest culture and the most thorough mental training. A brief 
description of the courses of study in this department is here presented : 

The Classical Course gives a prominent place to those branches 
that for centuries have been considered the leading disciplinary studies : 
Greek, Latin and Mathematics. A thorough study of mathematics is 
universally recognized as of the highest value. The Latin and Greek 
languages are unsurpassed store-houses of intellectual strength. These 
masterpieces in history, poetry and oratory, have been studied with de- 
light by the great scholars of all civilized nations. This course also 
furnishes opportunity for the efficient study of French, German. Litera- 
ture, History, the Sciences, Psychology and Philosophy. 

The Latin Scientific Course differs from the classical in that 
there is no Greek, but opportunity for the more thorough study of Mod- 
ern Languages and the Natural Sciences. The Classical and the Latin 
Scientific are of the same length — four years each. 

The Scientific Course is a new course that is now offered for the 
first time. The offering of this course is not a hast} 7 movement. It has 
been under discussion for several years. It is an effort to offer the very 
choicest course of study that can be mastered in two years. The special 
feature of this course is the prominence that is given to scientific studies. 



ADMISSION. 



The Classical course in the Academic Department, or its equivalent, 
is required of those who enter the Collegiate Classical Course. To enter 
either the Latin Scientific or the Scientific Course, the student must have 
completed the Scientific Course in the Academic Department, or its 
equivalent . 



DEGREES. 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon those who have 
completed either the Classical or the Latin Scientific Course. The de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon those who have completed 
the Scientific Course. The graduates of the Classical or Latin Scientific 
Course who have pursued literary or scientific studies for three years 
after graduation, are entitled to the degree of Master of Arts. 



TRAINING OF TEACHERS. 



The importance of thoroughly trained teachers for the public schools 
is being rapidly recognized. The lawmakers of Oregon have recently 
recognized this fact more clearly than ever before by the almost unan- 
imous passing of the following bill : 

Be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the State of Oregon, 
That all persons who shall complete a required course of study 
and receive a literary degree therefor in any institution of learning 
of collegiate or university grade, chartered or incorporated under the 
laws of this state, and shall have passed such examination thereon as 
may be approved by the State Board of Education, shall be entitled to 
receive a State Diploma, as is now authorized by law, and after six years 
of successful teaching in the State of Oregon, shall be entitled to the 
State Life Diploma, as now provided by law, when they shall have paid 
the required fee for said diploma." 

The rapidity with which college graduates are securing the best 
salaried positions in the public schools, is a strong argument to those 
who expect to teach to secure the most thorough preparation for their 
work. Experience has abundantly shown that the best preparation for 
successful teaching is the thorough mental training and the broad cul- 
ture that are secured in the collegiate course of study. The college 
graduate with his trained mental powers can master the professional 
studies very easily. McMinnville College will spare no pains in offering 
to those who desire thorough training for teaching the best advantages. 
When desired, special classes in the History of Education, the Theory 
and Practice of Teaching and School Government, will be organized. 



8 


The Classical Course. Freshman Year. 


FALL. TERM. 


winter term. 


SPRING TERM. 


Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 


Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Trg'metry and Surveying 


Xenophon 


Homer 


Homer 




SophomoVe Year. 


Tacitus 


Horace 


Horace 


German 


German 


German 


University Algebra 


University Algebra 


Herodotus 


German Literature 


0. T. History 

Junior Year. 


N. T. History 


Sophocles 


Euripides 


French 


Logic 


Psychology 


Astronomy 


Electives — 






German, Latin 


Latin, German 


Greek, German 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Botany, Geology 


General Geometry 


General Geometry 


History of England 


History of Greece 


History of France 


English Literature 


Biblical Literature 


Biblical Literature 
Senior Year. 




Physics 


Physics 


Moral Philosophy 


Greek Testament 


Greek Testament 


Political Economy 


Electives — 






Christian Evidences 


French 


International Law 


French 


History of Philosophy 


r 


History of England 


History of the U. S. 


History of the U. S. 


English Literature 


American Literature 


American Literature 



9 
THE LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 






Freshman Year. 




FALL TERM. 


winter term. 


SPRING term. 




Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 




Geouietrj' 


Trigonometry 


Trg'metryand Surveying 




Zoology 


Rhetoric 
Chemistry 


Botany 


■ 




Sophomore Year. 




Tacitus 


Horace 


Horace 




German 


German 


German 




University Algebra 


University Algebra 


:S. T. History 




German Literature 


0. T. History 

Junior Year. 


Geology 




Logic 


French 


French 




German 


Psychology 


Astronomy 




Electives— 








General Geometry 


General Geometry 


German 




Latin, Chemistry 


Chemistry, Latin 


History of England 




History of Greece 


History of France 


English Literature 




Biblical Literature 


Biblical Literature 
Senior Year. 


Rhetoric 




Physics 


Physics 


Moral Philosophy 




French 


French 


Political Economy 




Electives — 








German 


History of Philosophy 


International Law 




Christian Evidences 


History of the U. S. 






History of England 


American Literature 


History of the U. S. 




English Literature 




American Literature 



10 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Junior Year. 



Virgil Livy 

Geometry Trigonometry 

American Literature Chemistry 



Livy 

Trg'metry and Surveying 

Botany 



Senior Year. 



German 

Zoology 

Electives — 

Biblical Literature 

Logic 

University Algebra 

Historv 



German 
Geology 



Astronomy 



Biblical Literature German 

French French 

University Algebra Psychology 
History Moral Philosophy 

Rhetoric 



11 

THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT.* 



The aim of this department is to give the best education that can be 
given in the period of two or three years. The greatest educational 
need of the Pacific Coast to-day is first-class academies; academies with 
liberal endowments, thorough courses of study and abundant facilities 
for scientific experiments. It is the special ambition of the trustees and 
faculty of McMinnville College to build up in McMinnville such an 
academy — one that has no superior in the United States, and from which 
it will be an honor to graduate. This department offers four courses of 
study ot three years each: the Classical, the Scientific the Normal and 
the Business. Ineach course special attention, when necessary, is given 
to the common branches. No thorough education can be secured with- 
out the thorough mastery of these branches. 

The Classical Course is preparatory to the collegiate classical. It 
aims to give thorough preparation for college in Arithmetic, Algebra, 
Geometry, History, English Literature, Science, Latin and Greek. 

The Scientific Course is preparatory to the Collegiate Latin-Scien- 
tific and Scientific. It differs from the Classical in having one term of 
English Literature and two terms of Physics instead of Greek. This 
has proved to be the popular course of the academy. This course is an 
excellent preparation for business life, as well as a preparation for 
college. This course is heartily recommended to those who can remain 
in school only about three years. 

The Normal Course has no Latin. Instead, it offers opportunity 
for the study of such professional studies as the Art of Teaching and the 
Art of School Management. This is as thorough a course as many 
teachers have taken, but those expecting to teach are earnestly urged to 
take a more extended course of study. 

The Business Course gives prominence to the study of mathemat- 
ics. It is especially adapted to fit young men and women for the prac- 
tical duties of business life. Plans are under consideration for the thor- 
ough revision of this course with a view to make it fully equal to the 
courses of study in the best Business Colleges. 

Special Studies. 

Students not desiring to take a regular course will be allowed to 
take any study in any of the courses, collegiate or academic, for which 
they are fitted to do the work satisfactorily. Attention, however, is 
called to the fact that as a rule a student will get more benefit by enter- 
ing a regular course. 



12 

Requirements for Admission. 

For admission to the classical or scientific course, students will be 
examined in the studies of the "first year" of the normal course. The 
studies of this year are arranged with a view to accommodate those 
students whose educational opportunities have been very limited. 
Students of 12 or 14 years of age, w r ho have availed themselves of ordi- 
nary educational advantages, will be able to enter upon the studies of 
this first year of the normal course. When they have mastered the 
studies of this year, they will be able to enter the junior year of the 
academic classical or scientific course. Many students will be able to 
enter the second year of the noraial or business course. Students taking 
two studies in the collegiate department will pay collegiate tuition. 

Graduation. 

Certificates of Graduation are given to those who complete any one 
of the courses in this department, also to those completing the miisic 
course. The graduating exercises from this department attract deserved 
attention. 







13 


ACADEMIC COURSES OF STUDY. 




The Classical Course. 




Junior Year. 




FALL TERM. 


WINTER TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


i 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Latin Grammar 
Physiology 


Arithmetic 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric » 
Physical Geography 

Middle Year. 


Algebra 

Latin Reader 

Rhetoric 

Physical Geography 


Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 


Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 

Senoir Year. 


Caesar 
Algebra 
History of Rome 


Cicero 
Algebra 
Greek Lessons 


Cicero 

Geometry 

Xenophon 


Virgil 

Geometry 

Xenophon 


THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 




Junior Year.' 




Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Latin Grammar 
Physiology 


Arithmetic 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
Physical Geography 

Middle Year. 


Algebra 

Latin Reader 

Rhetoric 

Physical Geography 


Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 


Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 

Senior Year. 


Caesar 
Algebra 
History of Rome 


Cicero 

Algebra 

Physics 


Cicero 

Geometry 

Physics 


Virgil 
Geometry 
English Literature 



14 






THE NORMAL COURSE. 


1 


First Year. 




FALL TERM. 


WINTER TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 


Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 

Second Year. 


Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 


Arith metic 
English Grammar 
Physiology 


Arithmetic 
Physical Geography 
Rhetoric 

Third Year. 


Algebra 
Rhetoric 
Physical Geography 


Book-keeping 
General History 
Algebra 
English Literature 


School Management 
General History 
Algebra 


Roman History 
Art of Teaching 
Algebra 


THE BUSINESS COURSE. 




First Year. 




Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 


Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 

Second Year. 


Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

U. S. History 

Reading 

Spelling 


Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Physiology 
History 


Arithmetic 
Physical Geography 
Rhetoric 
History 

Third Year. 


Algebra 

Physical Geography 

Rhetoric 

Roman History 


Algebra 

Book-keeping 

Phvsics 

1 


Algebra 

Geometry 

Physics 


Algebra 
Geometry 
English Literature 

• 



35 



THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Recognizing that the fine arts are an important element in mental 
culture, and that attainments in instrumental and vocal music are of 
great practical value to young men and women, special effort has been 
put forth the last two years to make the musical department of this 
college one of the best in the state. The growth of this department has 
been exceptionally encouraging. While the aim has been to secure the 
most efficient teaching that can be secured, it has also been the desire of 
the institution to make the tuition as low as possible, in order that those 
of limited means may avail themselves of the advantages that are 
offered. Superior instruction in vocal music in classes is offered at 
merely a nominal tuition. The value of the voice culture that is thus 
secured cannot be overestimated. Its value is seen not only in singing, 
but in public speaking as well. 

Sight-Reading Class. 

All pupils whether studying instrumental or vocal music, should 
enter the department of sight-reading. The ability to read music at 
sight lies at the basis of a true musical education. Very few among the 
thousands who are studying music are able to read even plain hymn 
tune correctly at sight, consequently labor under great disadvantage. 



16 



MUSIC COURSE. 



Piano. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Urbach's Piano Instructor, with Clementi Sonatines. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Lebert and Stark Book II. Kuhlau Sonatines, Haydn Sonatas, 
Technical Exercises and Scales from memory. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Heller op. 46 and 45. Czerny, op. 299, Mozart and Schubert Sonatis, 
Plaidy Technical Studies. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Cramer Studies, parts 1, 2 and 3. Bach's two part inventions. 
Kulluck's Octave Studies. Plaidy Technical Studies. Mendellssohn's 
Songs without words. Beethoven Sonatas. Chopin Waltzes. Elements 
of Harmony, Emery. 

FOURTH XEAR. 

Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum, parts 1 and 2. Bach's Well-Tem- 
pered Clavichord. Chopin Nocturnes and Ballades. Concertos, by 
Mendellssohn, Hummel and Beethoven; also concert pieces by Mendell- 
ssohn, Weber, Kubenstein and Liszt. Elements of Harmony, Emery. 

All pupils entering the four years course in piano, must have a 
knowledge of the rudiments of music, and must have completed the 
work of the preparatory department or its equivalent. 

The course of study in piano-forte playing is systematically arranged, 
and pupils who complete the course will be graduated in music with an 
appropriate diploma. The time occupied in completing this course will 
depend upon the ability of the pupil and the proportion of time devoted 
to musical study. 



J 7 



EXPENSES. 



Tuition in the Collegiate Department, $14 a term ; in the Academic 
Department, ijll a term. Room rent in the college building $3, $4, $5 a 
term, each student, according to room. Fuel, each room, per year, #8, 
$10, $12, according to room. Elocution, in class, one lesson a week, 
$1 a term. Vocal music, in class, two lessons a week, (24 lessons) $1.25 
a term. Private lessons in voice culture, on the piano, organ, banjo or 
guitar, one lesson a week per term of 13 weeks, Sf 8.5 J, $9, .19.50, accord- 
ing to grade of student. Private lessons in voice culture, on the piano, 
organ, banjo or guitar, one lesson a week, half term (six lessons) $4, 
if-4. 25, .14.50, according to grade of student. When two lessons a week 
are taken, a reduction of trn per cent is given. Use of piano, one hour 
a day, .13 per term. Diploma, $5. 

It is the rule or the college that all bills are to be paid in 

ADVANCE. No BILLS ARE MADE OUT FOR LESS THAN HALF A TERM. JSo 

deductions are made except in cases of protracted sickness. Absences 
of a few days invariably make extra work for teachers. 

Inquiry is often made as to the expense for a year. The following 
table covers all the necessary expenses. The lowest and the highest 
necessary expenses are given. The total annual expense— exclusive 
of clothing and traveling expenses — need not exceed $200. 

Lowest. Highest, 

Tuition $ 33 $ 42 

Room Rent 9 15 

Fuel and Lights 12 18 

Board $3 a week, 39 weeks 117 117 

Washing 10 16 

Books 6 12 

$187 $220 



18 • 

Rooms and Boarding. 

Each room in the college building is furnished with a stove. The 
student furnishes everything else. If desirable, or necessary, two 
students will occupy one room. By so doing, there is a saving in fuel 
and lights, and in furnishing the room. Many students bring their 
furniture with them. For several years there has been a boarding de- 
partment in the basement of the college building. Table board this 
last year was $3 a week. Adjoining the living rooms of the President 
are a few rooms that young ladies are allowed to occupy. Several stu- 
dents often club together and hire a house, or rooms and board them- 
selves, thus saving from a dollar to a dollar and a half a week. 

Facts Worth Conning. 

The aim of this college is "to offer young men and women the best 
education possible at the least possible expense to them." The study 
of a large number of catalogues shows that at many colleges- the 
expenses are very much higher. In several colleges of this state, the 
tuition is considerably higher than at McMinnville. In nearly all the 
tuition in music is higher. Board in private families is as cheap or 
cheaper than in any college town in the state. 

Compared with Eastern Colleges 

expenses are much lower at McMinnville. At the University of 
Rochester tuition is $75 a year; at Amherst, $110 and room rent from 
$18 to $45 a year ; at Rutgers, tuition $75 a year, incidentals $8 and 
reading room fee $2. At Wesleyan tuition is $75 a year, room rent from 
$12 to $50 and incidentals $21 a year. At Brown University tuition is 
$100 a year, room rent $32 to $7 J, incidentals, for those not residing in 
the college, $29 a year, and for those in the college, $43. At the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania tuition is $150 a year. 

In Peddie Institute, music is $50 a year; in Bucknell University, $45 
a year ; in Cook Academy, $60 a year ; in Syracuse University, $100 a 
year; in Connecticut Literary Institute, 75 cents a lesson; in Whitman 
College, 24 half-hour lessons for $16 ; in Ottawa University, 20 lessons 
for $12, $15, $18 according to grade of student; in California College, $40 
a year; in the University of Oregon, $1 a lesson. These facts are all 
taken from the catalogues of the above institutions. They show r that 
tuition in all departments in McMinnville College is considerably cheap- 
er than in many other institutions, both East and West, although ex- 
penses in the East are supposed to be much less than on the Pacific 
Coast. 



19 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Location. 



McMinnville College is located just outside the city limits of Mc- 
Minnville, Oregon. McMinnville is easily accessible from every part 
of the North Pacific coast, being situated on the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, west side division, 50 miles south of Portland. From all points 
south there is direct connection ; by the way of Albany and Corvallis, or 
by stage from Salem to McCoy and thence by the Southern Pacific to 
McMinnville, or by way of Portland. 

Building and Grounds. 

The college has a campus of 30 acres, admirably adapted for the 
purpose and beautiful for situation. Upon this campus there was built 
in 1882 one of the finest buildings for educational purposes to be found 
on the Pacific coast. The building is 106 feet in length, 79 in breadth, 
and four stories in height. The basement story contains accommoda- 
tions for a boarding department ; the second affords a commodious 
chapel, President's rooms, class rooms, etc. ; the third and fourth, class 
rooms, library, a number of eligible rooms for students, and Philergian 
hall. 

Government. 

The institution, though founded and equipped by the Baptist denom- 
ination, offers its advantages to all shades of opinion alike. The de- 
nomination that has been, in all ages, the champion of religious liberty, 
will assuredly be the last to infringe upon the conscientious convictions 
of others. It is the only Baptist College in the state of Oregon. 



20 

Discipline. 

Self-goverrnent is the ideal at McMinnville College. Students are 
expected to conform to the usages of good society, and to conduct them- 
selves as they would in a refined, well-ordered home. Only those who 
are willing to do so are desired as pupils. No set of rules to cover all 
cases can be laid down. A high moral sense is necessary to guide a 
student in a society like this. If a student does not have this and it 
cannot be developed in him, his parents will be notified, after a due 
trial, to remove him from the school. This is not a reform school; 
young men are expected to give evidence of manhood, and young women 

Of WOMANHOOD. 

Text Books. 

Only a partial list of text books is here given. Arithmetic, Fish; 
Grammar, CI aik, Reed & Kellogg; Algebra, Robinson's Elementary, 
Olney; Geometry, Trigonometry, Wentworth ; IT. S. History, Barnes; 
General History, Barnes; Rhetoric, Hill; Physiology, Hutchinson; 
Physical Geography, Appleton ; Latin Grammar and Reader, Harkness; 
Harkness* Preparatory Course in Latin Prose Authors ; Greek Grammar, 
Goodwin; First Lessons in Greek, White; Anabasis, Goodwin; Roman 
History, Leighton ; English Literature, Shaw ; Logic, Jevon ; Psychol- 
ogy, Hill; Chemistry, Steele; Geology, Dana; Astronomy, Young; 
French, Ann ; German, Ahn ; Moral Philosophy, Robinson. 

Elocution. 

During the last year at the Friday evening literary and musical 
entertainments, all the students have had the opportunity of presenting 
declamations or orations. Private drill in elocution is given free of 
charge to all who take part in these exercises. The Philergian society 
furnishes also an excellent opportunity in this line of work. During 
the coining year, elocution will receive still more attention. In addition 
to the drilling for the public entertainments, classes for extra w y ork in 
elocution will be organized, if desired. 

The English Bible. 

During the last year, both Old and New Testament history has been 
studied in the class room. Biblical Literature has not yet received in 
our colleges the attention that it deserves. It is hoped that arrange- 
ments can be made to give much more attention to this important 
branch the coming year. 



21 

The Library. 

During the year the library has been re-arranged so that it is much 
easier for students to find material upon any desired subject. The ob- 
servance of "McMinnville College Library Day" by the Sunday Schools 
of the state was more general than any preceding year. In this way 
quite a number of valuable books have been added to the library. 
Through the kindness of friends at Washington, valuable additions are 
also received from time to time. The donation of valuable books 
secured by the Kinney Legacy have been found of great value. The 
library now is an excellent one, for its size. Great libraries grow, book 
b}' book. Constant additions must be made. We look to the friends of 
the college for these additions. 

The Reading Room. 

The interest in this room is growing year by year. A partial list of 
the papers in the reading room the last year is the following: The Exam- 
iner, The Standard, The Christian Herald, The Christian Inquirer, The 
Mail and Express, The Chicago Herald, The Leader, The Pacific Baptist, 
The Vanguard, The Baptist Sentinel, The Baptist Teacher, The Worker, 
The Missionary Review, The Educational Review, The Forum, The 
Telephone, The Reporter, The Astorian, The Young Men's Era. Most 
of these will be in the reading room the comirg year. It is hoped that 
others may be added. Contributions to this room are solicited. 

Societies. 

The Philergian Society, composed of young ladies and gentlemen, 
meets regularly each Saturday evening. The exercises, consisting of 
singing, debates, essays, recitations, orations, declamations, etc., are of 
great value to the students. 

The Missionarv Society holds a public meeting once a month. 
These meetings are growing in interest and in value. During the pres- 
ent year, there has been a systematic study of various mission fields. 

There is also among the students an organization of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Christian Association. 
These hold meetings regularly for the study of the Bible and for religious 
culture. These meetings have proved to be of great benefit to many 
students, encouraging them in christian work and fitting them for larger 
usefulness in after years. 

Religious Culture. 

This college was founded to promote christian culture. Every 



22 



teacher is a professed christian. The Baptist church of McMinnville 
takes special interest in the religious culture of students. Many of the 
students are earnest christians and deeply interested in their fellow 
students. Firmly believing that intellectual culture and religious cul- 
ture should be closely united, patrons of the college may rest assured 
that earnest efforts will be put forth to make the religious atmosphere 
healthv to the best culture of the students. 



Aid to Students. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to have McMinnville College always 
accessible to young men and women of limited means, especially such 
as desire an education that they may become useful in some form of 
Christian work. Direct aid is not given to any extent, but a number of 
students are each year furnished with work by the friends of the college 
to pay in part their expenses. A boy or girl of pluck and perse verence 
can work out an education, and is encouraged to do so. Applications for 
work should be made to the President at an early day and accompanied 
with suitable references. Young men with the ministry in view and 
young women who desire to fit themselves to become missionaries are 
especially invited to correspond with the President, and every effort will 
be put forth to help such secure a thorough education. A leading 
feature of the Oregon Baptist Education Society is to assist approved 
students in Baptist schools. 

Endowment. 

The college has a small endowment fund, the interest of which 
materially assists in meeting current expenses, but this endowment is 
by no means anything like as large as it ought to be. The college is now 
on such a safe financial basis, that it can confidently appeal to its friends 
to give it a much larger endowment. This is one of its pressing needs. 

The Natural Sciences. 



Until the last year but little work has been done in these branches. 
Last year Prof. W. F. Fargo w r as secured to give special attention to 
these important studies. Excellent work has been done. Quite a large 
number of experiments were given. The great need of this department 
is more apparatus. It is the intention to give increased attention to 
scientific studies year by year. 



23 



Things Expected. 



1. All students to be present at chapel service each morning. 

2. Each student to attend church every Sunday morning. 

3. To report to the President before leaving town. 

4. Each student to be manly enough to pay for all damages to 
grounds or buildings through his fault. 

5. Each student to observe study hours from 9 a. m. to 12; from 
1 to 4, and from 7 to 9 p. m. 

6. Each student to keep his room neat. 

7. In a word, that each young man shall be a gentleman and each 
young woman a lady, observing the proprieties of good society. 

Things Prohibited. 

1. Entertainment of the opposite sex in any student's room. 

2. The dropping of a study without leave of the President. 

3. Any student to take more than three full studies unless he has 
an average standing of 90. 

4. The use of tobacco on the college grounds. 

5. The visiting of any saloon or billiard hall. 

Examinations 

Are held from time to time, occupying the time of the regular recitation. 
As a rule, examinations are held at the close of each term ; sometimes 
at the close of a study only, when it comes near the end of a term. All 
recitations and examinations are marked on a scale of 10J, and an 
average of 70 is required before passing from one class to another. 
An accurate record of the standing of each student is pre- 
served, both of recitations and examinations. Reports will be sent to 
parents or guardians on application. In all reports, unless otherwise 
requested by parents or guardians, standing will be marked as follows: 
95-100, excellent; 90-95, good; 8,»-90, fair; 70-8J, poor. 

A Word to Students. 

Do not fail to be present on the first day of first term with the deter- 
mination to stay in school the full year. Your school days are passing 
by very rapidly, and you cannot afford to lose a single week from school 
the coming year. Remember too that classes are formed and that work 
begins the first day. Then make up your mind to enter the first day 
upon one of the regular courses of study. Both for discipline of mind 



and for immediate practical benefit, you will accomplish much more by 
entering a regular course than in any other way. Remember also that 
you can obtain a thorough education if you will. Do you desire to fit 
yourself for the duties and responsibilities of life? Do you desire to fit 
yourself to fill a position of usefulness and honor? Do you desire to be 
a graduate of a college that has a magnificent future? Your desire may 
become a reality if you are willing to make self-denial and spend a few 
years in hard work. No matter how poor you are in pocket, if you are 
determined to go through college, you can do it. Will you do it? 

A Word to Parents. 

If you cannot give your sons and daughters anything else, give them 
a good education. It may call for self-denial and sacrifice on your 
part, but you can well afford to make it. Try and keep them, in school 
every school day in the year. Then remember that it is of the utmost 
importance in what school you educate your sons and daughters. You 
cannot afford to educate them in any other than a christian school. If 
you are a Baptist you cannot afford to educate them in any other than a 
Baptist school. If you are a Baptist in Oregon you cannot afford to 
educate them in any other school than McMinnville College. 

Special Request. 

You who receive this catalogue will receive it because you are be- 
lieved to be deeply interested in higher education. Your help in the 
building up of McMinnville College is earnestly solicited. There are 
many ways in which you can do so. You can speak a good word for 
the college. You can place this catalogue in the hands of persons whose 
thoughts and hearts may be turned toward the college. You can send 
the President names of persons who might be favorably influenced by a 
catalogue or a personal letter from him. You can remember this school 
in your prayers ; you can remember it in your will. The college looks to 
you for help in one or all of these various ways. See to it that she does 
not look in vain. 

The Outlook. 

In considering the outlook, many things must be remembered. It 
must be remembered that the population of Oregon is considerably less 
than half a million. It must be remembered that the Willamette Valley 
alone, outside from Roman Catholic schools, has not less than seven 
colleges, a state normal school, and thirteen academies. With two ex- 
ceptions, these are all within sixty miles of McMinnville. Remember- 
ing these things, the outlook of McMinnville is certainly full of hope. 



25 

The college has fine grounds and a fine building, an increasing endow- 
ment, an excellent faculty, a strong Board of Trustees — all backed up by 
a great denomination that is taking an increasing interest in higher 
education. The last year has been an excellent one — by far the best 
financial year in the history of the college. The college certainly has an 
encouraging outlook. 

Correspondence with young men and women, especially with 
parents and guardians, is solicited, and any information not found in this 
catalogue will be gladly furnished by addressing the President, 

T. G. BROWNSON, 

McMinnville, Oregon. 



26 



NAMES OF STUDENTS. 



NAMES. RESIDENCE. DEPARTMENT. 

Florence Alexander Independence Academic 

Myrtie Apperson McMinnville " 

Alsea Baker - " 

Frank W. Bewley " " 

Edith Brown North Yamhill " 

William Brown Cheney, Wash " 

Madison Cobb McMinnville " 

Etta Cook " " 

WilberCook " " • 

Bradford Dodson " " 

Sadie Fitch Carlton " 

Eleanor Florey Gaston • ' 

Delia Garrison McMinnville " 

James A. Glover Whites " 

Florence A. Goulter Ilwaco, Wash " 

Eddie Graham " " 

Ella Grubbe Newport " 

Mitchell Haynes Haynesville " 

A. B. Hemstock McMinnville " 

Myrtle Henderson " " 

Robert Henderson " " 

Ralph Herbert " 

Rupert C. Hill Albany 

Albert Hnguelet McMinnville " 

John W. Hilleary Damascus " 

Bertie Ingraham Amity " 

Willie Johnson McMinnville " 

Leela Jones Amity " 

Myrtle Knowles McMinnville " 

Lvman E. Latourette Oregon City 

Nellie E. Latourette " " 

Nina Latourette " Collegiate 

Doll Leabo McMinnville Academic 

Kate Leabo " 

Jordan Lynch " " 

] ,uella Lvnch " 









27 




John W. Loder 


Carlton 


Academic 




Colman Mark 


Aurora 


" 




Gertrude Mark 


" 


«« 




Jewell Mark 

Thomas Mark 


1 1 


a 




u 


tt 




Nellie Mc Milieu 


Ballston 


• " 




Arthur Me Phillips 


McMinn ville 


c t 




D. Carl Miller 


. . . .North Yamhill 


" 




Lottie Miller 

Walter C. Miller 

Ethlyn Million 

Grace Million 

Mav Million 


" 


it 




<< 


1 1 




. . . . Stevensville, Montana. . . . 


a 






a 




a a 


1 1 




Jennie iNiuhols 


Astoria 


1 1 




E. M. Oliver 


. . . . McAj inn ville 


a 




Anna Pagenkopf 


... .Wells 


t i 




Ida Pagenkopf 


....Wells 


.... '*' 




Lena Pagenkopf 

Elmer Purvine 


Wells .... 


a 




Zena 


.... Collegiate 




Frank Purvine 

Matthew G. Redmond 


" 


Academic 




McMinnville 


(< 




William D. Risley 

Arthur C. Rovce 


.... Albany. . 


n 




. . . .Gooseberry 


i e - 




May Rogers 


McMinnville 


" 




Sara Scott 


Carlton 


<« 




Willie Scott 

Helen Shaw 


a 






. . . .North Powder 







F. T. Shaw . . : 

Marv Shaw 


t * 


(( 




a 


a 




Lena Shelton 


.... Carlton 


. . . .Collegiate 




Ruby Shurtleff 


. . . .Mc Jinnville 


Academic 




William F. Simpson 

Ella Simpson 

Ida A. Skinner. 


. . . .Corvallis, Montana 


« 






a 




. . . McMinnville 






Rebecca Smith 


Brownsville 


Academic 




Albert Sprague 




a 




Frank Stetson 

Ralph Storey 


Seattle, Wash 


a 




McMinnville 


.... 




Singue Swanson 

Willie W. Tidd 


Carlton 


a 




North Yamhill 


.... 




Lillian Tower 

John W. Townsend 


" 


1 1 




McMinnville 


it 




George Williams 


.... Manchester, Iowa 


" 




Hattie M. Wright 


McMinnville 







Daisv Young 


<< 


a 











28 


MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 






Instrumental. 




Florence Alexander 


Myrtie Apperson 




Pearl Campbell 


Nora Cooper 




Sadie Fitch 


Florence Goulter 




Holda Granstrom 


Lizzie Handley 




Mitchell Haynes 


Myrtle Henderson 




Albert Huguelet 


Leela Jones 




Lyman Latourette 


Nellie Latourette 




Nina Latourette 


Luella Lynch 




Gertrude Mark 


Jewell Ma.k 




Thomas Mark 


Ethlyn Million 




Grace Million 


May Million 




Jennie Nichols 


Ida Pagenkopf 




Lena Pagenkopf 


W. D. Risley 




Arthur Royce 


Lena Shelton 




Ruby Shurtleff 


Sadie Smith 




Albert Sprague 


Singue Swanson 




Willie VV. Tidd 


Vocal. 




Bradford Dodson 


Sadie Fitch 




Florence Goulter 


Eddie Graham 




Mitchell Haynes 


Albert Huguelet 




Bertie Ingraham 


Lyman Latourette 




Nellie Latourette 


Nina Latourette 




Doll Leabo 


Kate Leabo 




John Loder 


Colman Mark 




Gertrude Mark 


Arthur McPhillips 




Lottie Miller 


Ethlyn Million 




May Million 


Jennie Nichols 




E. M. Oliver 


Anna Pagenkopf 




W. I). Risley 


Arthur Royce 




May Rogers 


Roy Rogers 




Sara Scott 


Willie Scott 




Lena Shelton 


Ruby Shurtleff 




W. F. Simpson 


Ella Simpson 




Ida Skinner 


Rebecca Smith 




Albert Sprague 


Ralph Storey 




Singue Swanson 


W. W. Tidd 




George Williams